Sunday, August 31, 2014

Roasted Radish Home Fries


Want a different, healthier take on traditional white potato home fries? Try radishes instead! They're much lighter and have a wonderfully sweet and pungent flavor. You will also add a good dose of nutrients to your morning meal with these babies. Radishes are a great source of anthocyanins, a type of flavonoids, which not only give color to radishes, but also provide numerous health benefits[1].

And did you know that radishes are in the cruciferous family of vegetables? Like the other members of crucifers, they're packed with antioxidants. And the isthiocyanates found in radishes have a major impact on the genetic pathways of cancerous cells, preventing them from multiplying by a process called Apoptosis. Apoptosis is a process by which cells undergo programmed cell death. The cells do not die from damage itself. Instead, they undergo an orderly series of gene expression changes that ends in elimination of the cell.[2,3]



This is such an easy recipe... just cut up some radishes—as many as you want to serve— toss in your favorite seasonings and bake at 400° F until tender (about 30 minutes). I added some diced onion for extra flavor and used my go-to spice mix, Spike salt-free seasoning. Then I topped with fresh chopped parsley and got extra fancy with some edible chicory blossoms growing in abundance outside my house :) You can give the radishes a light coat of oil for baking if you wish, but mine turned out fine without any. Just use some parchment paper so they don't stick.

Enjoy!

Healthy trails,








References:
  1. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry"; Structure-function Relationships of Anthocyanins From Various Anthocyanin-rich Extracts. Jing et al; 2008
  2. Plant Foods and Human Nutrition"; Hexane Extract of Raphanus Sativus L. Roots Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis. Beevi et al; 2010
  3. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry"; Structure-function Relationships of Anthocyanins From Various Anthocyanin-rich Extracts. Jing et al; 2008
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